Yorkshire Pudding

Yorkshire Pudding

 

The secret to making Yorkshires (as they are known in the UK)   is to pour well rested, cold batter into slightly smoking hot fat and put immediately back into a really hot oven. It is as simple as that.  Keep in mind that this recipe came from my grandfathers family from Old England and the way it is written is from their time.  I changed the oven temperature to match our ovens for F.

Ingredients

4 large fresh eggs measured into a jug

Equal quantity of milk to your measured eggs

Equal quantity of all purpose/plain flour to measured eggs

Pinch of salt

2 tbsp lard, beef dripping or vegetable oil

Directions

Heat the oven to 450°F or the fat may burn.

Pour the eggs and milk into a large mixing bowl and add the pinch of salt. Whisk thoroughly with an electric hand beater or hand whisk. Leave to stand for 10 minutes.

Gradually sieve the same volume of flour (as the eggs) into the milk and egg mixture, again using an electric hand beater or hand-whisk to create a lump free batter resembling thick cream, if there are any lumps pass the batter through a fine sieve.

Leave the batter to rest in the kitchen for a minimum of 30 minutes, longer if possible – up to several hours.

Place a pea-sized piece of lard, dripping or ½ tsp vegetable oil into your chosen York shire pudding tin or a 12-hole muffin tin and heat in the oven until the fat is smoking. Give the batter another good whisk adding 2 tbsp of cold water and fill a third of each section of the tin with batter and return quickly to the oven.

Leave to cook until golden brown approx 20 minutes. Repeat the last step again until all the batter is used up.

Serving Yorkshire Pudding

In Yorkshire serving the pudding is traditionally with gravy as a starter dish followed by the meat and vegetables. More often smaller puddings cooked in muffin tins are served alongside meat and vegetables.

Yorkshire pudding isn’t reserved only for Sunday lunch. A large pudding filled with a meaty stew or chili is a dish in its own right.

Cold left-over Yorkshire Puddings make a lovely snack with a little jam or honey.

Amish Sourdough Pancakes

Amish Sourdough Pancakes

Ingredients

2 c buttermilk pancake mix

1 ½ c water

1 c Amish Friendship Bread Starter

Directions

Place the pancake mix in a large bowl. Add the water and Amish Friendship Bread Starter and stir until well combined.

Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each pancake. Brown on both sides and serve hot.

Amish Friendship Bread Starter

Amish Friendship Bread starter baggedAmish Friendship Bread Starter Baked

Ingredients

1 package active dry yeast

¼ cup warm water (110 degrees F)

3 cups all purpose flour

3 cups white sugar, divided

3 cups milk

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in water. Let stand 10 minutes. In a 2 quart container glass, plastic or ceramic container, combine 1 cup flour and 1 cup sugar. Mix thoroughly or flour will lump when milk is added. Slowly stir in 1 cup milk and dissolved yeast mixture. Cover loosely and let stand until bubbly. Consider this day 1 of the 10 day cycle. Leave loosely covered at room temperature.
  2. On days 2 through 4; stir starter with a spoon. Day 5; stir in 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar and 1 cup milk. Days 6 through 9; stir only.
  3. Day 10; stir in 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar and 1 cup milk. Remove 1 cup to make your first bread, give 2 cups to friends along with this recipe, and your favorite Amish Bread recipe. Store the remaining 1 cup starter in a container in the refrigerator, or begin the 10 day process over again (beginning with step 2).

Once you have made the starter, you will consider it Day One, and thus ignore step 1 in this recipe and proceed with step 2. You can also freeze this starter in 1 cup measures for later use. Frozen starter will take at least 3 hours at room temperature to thaw before using.