CARVING A NECK OF VEAL

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The best end of a neck of veal makes a very good roasting-piece; it, however, is composed of bone and ribs that make it quite difficult to carve, unless it is done properly.

To attempt to carve each chop and serve it, you would not only place too large a piece upon the plate of the person you intend to serve, but you would waste much time, and should the vertebrate have not been removed by the butcher, you would be compelled to exercise such a degree of strength that would make one’s appearance very ungraceful, and possibly, too, throwing gravy over your neighbor sitting next to you.

The correct way to carve this roast is to cut diagonally from fig. 1 to 2, and help in slices of moderate thickness; then it may be cut from 3 to 4, in order to separate the small bones; divide and serve them, having first inquired if they are desired.

This joint is usually sent to the table accompanied by bacon, ham, tongue, or pickled pork, on a separate dish and with a cut lemon on a plate. There are also a number of sauces that are suitable with this roast.

CARVING A FILLET OF VEAL

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A fillet of veal is one of the prime roasts of veal; it is taken from the leg above the knuckle; a piece weighing from ten to twelve pounds is a good size and requires about four hours for roasting. Before roasting, it is dressed with a force meat or stuffing placed in the cavity from where the bone was taken out and the flap tightly secured together with skewers; many bind it together with tape.

To carve it, cut in even thin slices off from the whole of the upper part or top, in the same manner as from a rolled roast of beef, as in the direction of the figs. 1 and 2; this gives the person served some of the dressing with each slice of meat.

Veal is very unwholesome unless it is cooked thoroughly, and when roasted should be of a rich brown color. Bacon, fried pork, sausage-balls, with greens, are among the accompaniments of roasted veal, also a cut lemon.

HOW TO CARVE BREAST OF VEAL

carving-breast-of-veal

This piece is quite similar to a fore-quarter of lamb after the shoulder has been taken off. A breast of veal consists of two parts, the rib-bones and the gristly brisket. These parts may be separated by sharply passing the carving knife in the direction of the line from 1 to 2; and when they are entirely divided, the rib-bones should be carved in the direction of the line from 5 to 6, and the brisket can be helped by cutting slices from 3 to 4. The carver should ask the guests whether they have a preference for the brisket or ribs; and if there be a sweetbread served with the dish, as is frequently with this roast of veal, each person should receive a piece. Though veal and lamb contain less nutrition than beef and mutton, in proportion to their weight, they are often preferred to these latter meats on account of their delicacy of texture and flavor. A whole breast of veal weighs from nine to twelve pounds.

CUTS OF MEAT FOR VEAL

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CUTS OF MEAT FOR VEAL HIND-QUARTER

No. 1. Cuts of meat include the loin, the choicest cuts used for roasts and chops.

No. 2. Cuts of meat include the fillet, used for roasts and cutlets.

No. 3. Cuts of meat include the loin, chump-end used for roasts and chops.

No. 4. Cuts of meat include the hind-knuckle or hock, used for stews, pot-pies, meat-pies.

CUTS OF MEAT FOR VEAL FORE-QUARTER

No. 5. Cuts of meat include the neck, best end used for roasts, stews and chops.

No. 6. Cuts of meat include the breast, best end used for roasting, stews and chops.

No. 7. Cuts of meat include the blade-bone, used for pot-roasts and baked dishes.

No. 8. Cuts of meat include the fore-knuckle, used for soups and stews.

No. 9. Cuts of meat include the breast, brisket-end used for baking, stews and pot-pies.

No. 10. Cuts of meat include the neck, scrag-end used for stews, broth, meat-pies, etc.

In cutting up veal, generally, the hind-quarter is divided into loin and leg, and the fore-quarter into breast, neck and shoulder.

The Several Parts of a Moderately-sized, Well-fed Calf, about eight weeks old, are nearly of the following weights:—Loin and chump, 18 lbs.; fillet, 12 lbs.; hind-knuckle, 5 lbs.; shoulder, 11 lbs.; neck, 11 lbs.; breast, 9 lbs., and fore-knuckle, 5 lbs.; making a total of 144 lbs. weight.